Home |  Cash Bids |  Charts |  Weather |  Headline News |  Markets Page |  Futures Markets |  Canada Wx |  Canadian Ag News |  Canadian Market News 
Headlines
Sask. and Ont. Crop Reports
7/19 4:50 PM

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop report from Saskatchewan Agriculture, for the period July 10 to 16. The report was released July 19.

Crops across the province are advancing quickly, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. Eighty percent of the fall cereals, 78% of the spring cereals, 76% of the oilseeds and 78% of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Crop conditions vary widely based on moisture levels but the majority of crops range from fair to excellent in condition.

Many areas of the province have seen another week of wild weather that brought hail, severe winds and crop damage; however, it also brought some much-needed moisture. Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 103 mm in the Glaslyn area. The Turtleford area reported 61 mm of rain, the Broadview area reported 18 mm, the Shaunavon area 48 mm, the Lumsden area 10 mm and the Saskatoon area 52 mm. Some areas in the west-central and southwestern regions are still in need of a significant rainfall to help crops fill pods and heads.

Despite this week's weather, livestock producers have continued with haying and now have 22% of the hay crop cut and 47% baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 7% excellent, 65% good, 25% fair and 3% poor. Many swaths are smaller than normal and hay yields are below average overall. Estimated average dryland hay yields at this time are one ton per acre for alfalfa and alfalfa/bromegrass; 0.8 ton per acre for other tame hay and 1.5 tons per acre for greenfeed. Estimated average irrigated hay yields are 2.1 tons per acre for alfalfa; 2.2 tons per acre for alfalfa/bromegrass and 2.7 tons per acre for greenfeed. Pasture growth is limited in some areas and a significant rainfall would be beneficial.

Across the province, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 2% surplus, 57% adequate, 30% short and 11% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 2% surplus, 45% adequate, 35% short and 18% very short.

Producers have seen crop damage this week from a variety of sources. High temperatures and strong winds throughout the province continued to stress crops. Storms brought localized flooding, hail and strong winds. There have been some reports of high numbers of grasshoppers in areas, along with some disease issues caused by fusarium head blight, root rots and leaf spot diseases. Due to recent high temperatures, there has been some damage due to heat blasting in flowering canola crops.

The following are the results by district:

SOUTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 1 -- CARNDUFF, ESTEVAN, REDVERS, MOOSOMIN AND KIPLING AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 2 -- WEYBURN, MILESTONE, MOOSE JAW, REGINA AND QU'APPELLE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3ASE -- RADVILLE AND LAKE ALMA AREAS)

Crops are advancing rapidly in the region and remain in good condition despite some thunderstorms bringing localized hail and severe winds. Livestock producers in the region now have 20% of the hay crop cut and 39% baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 9% excellent, 65% good and 26% fair. Hay yields are lower than average overall and many producers have indicated it is unlikely they will get a second cut. Pastures in the area have slow growth and could use a significant rainfall.

High temperatures and wind have continued to stress crops in the region, although some areas received light rainfall ranging from trace amounts to 34 mm in the Weyburn area. The Glenavon and Grenfell areas reported 21 mm of rain, the Tantallon area 11 mm, the Whitewood area 13 mm, the Frobisher area 18 mm, the Wilcox area 28 mm and the Moose Jaw area 7 mm. The Lampman area maintains the record for the most precipitation (393 mm) in both the region and the province since April 1.

Weather conditions have been hard on topsoil moisture over the past week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated at 1% surplus, 55% adequate, 37% short and 7% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 55% adequate, 38 percent short and 7% very short.

Crop damage was caused primarily by high temperatures and strong winds this week. Localized flooding and hail damage from thunderstorms were also reported.

Producers are keeping an eye on disease and insect issues in the field, and there are a few reports of leaf diseases causing early ripening in lentils. Producers are busy haying, preparing harvest equipment and scouting fields.

SOUTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 3ASW -- CORONACH, ASSINIBOIA AND OGEMA AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3AN -- GRAVELBOURG, MOSSBANK, MORTLACH AND CENTRAL BUTTE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3B -- KYLE, SWIFT CURRENT , SHAUNAVON AND PONTEIX AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 4 -- CONSUL, MAPLE CREEK AND LEADER AREAS)

Crops are advancing quickly due to recent high temperatures. Storms brought hail, wind and some much-needed moisture to parts of the region. Haying continues in the area and 16% of the hay crop is now cut and 63% baled or put into silage. Hay quality is currently rated as 52% good and 48% fair. Hay yields are well-below normal with many producers not expecting a second cut due to lack of regrowth. Pastures are in need of a significant rainfall, with many at carrying capacity.

Rainfall over the last week has ranged from trace amounts to 68 mm in the Admiral area. The Limerick area reported 30 mm of rain, the Tompkins and Ponteix areas 7 mm, the Mossbank area 11 mm, the Shaunavon area 48 mm, the Gouldtown area 37 mm, the Gull Lake area 12 mm and the Mortlach area 3 mm. The Hazenmore area has had the most precipitation (172 mm) in the region since April 1.

Topsoil moisture conditions in the area have worsened due to high temperatures throughout the week. Crop topsoil moisture is now rated as 27% adequate, 47% short and 26% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture has deteriorated and is rated as 16% adequate, 44% short and 40% very short. Crop District 3ASW is in need of significant moisture as 55% of cropland and 60% of hay land are very short on topsoil moisture.

Crop damage was caused primarily by lack of moisture and high temperatures; crops have been maturing quickly as a result. There has also been damage caused by large hail. Moisture is needed to help crops fill heads and pods.

Producers are busy haying, preparing equipment for harvest and assessing crops for environmental damage.

EAST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 5 -- MELVILLE, YORKTON, CUPAR, KAMSACK, FOAM LAKE, PREECEVILLE AND KELVINGTON AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 6A -- LUMSDEN, CRAIK, WATROUS AND CLAVET AREAS)

The region received variable weather this week, with high temperatures and localized thunderstorms bringing floods and hail damage. Crops are advancing nicely and are mostly in good condition. Haying continues in the region with 26% cut and 45% baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 9% excellent, 71% good, 13% fair and 7% poor. Hay yields have been below normal in the region due to lack of moisture.

The amount of rain in the region varied widely, ranging from trace amounts to 37 mm in the Jedburgh area. The Hubbard area reported 18 mm of rain, the Goodeve area 14 mm, the Rhein area 34 mm, the Elfros area 6 mm, the Pelly area 2 mm, the Lumsden area 10 mm, the Watrous area 17 mm and the Rocanville area 13 mm. The Langenburg area has received the most precipitation (369 mm) in the region since April 1.

Topsoil moisture conditions are similar to last week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 4% surplus, 51% adequate, 34% short and 11% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 3% surplus, 41% adequate, 39% short and 17% very short. Crop District 6A is in need of significant moisture, as 29% of cropland and 40% of hay land is very short on moisture.

Fungicide applications have wrapped up in the region. The majority of crop damage this week was due to weather, with some crops stressed from high temperatures and strong winds and other crops stressed from hail and localized flooding due to storms. The high temperatures over this past week have caused some heat blasting of pods in flowering canola crops.

Producers are haying, scouting fields and keeping an eye on the skies.

WEST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICTS 6B -- HANLEY, OUTLOOK, LOREBURN, SASKATOON AND ARELEE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 7A -- ROSETOWN, KINDERSLEY, ESTON, MAJOR; CD 7B -- KERROBERT, MACKLIN, WILKIE AND BIGGAR AREAS)

The region had high temperatures, strong winds and a few localized storms roll through this past week. Crops are advancing nicely in most areas but some are lacking moisture. Haying continues in the region with 23% of the hay crop cut and 50% baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 8% excellent, 67% good, 17% fair and 8% poor. Hay yields are below normal for the region.

Rainfall this past week varied from trace amounts to 53 mm in the Unity area. The Rosetown and Biggar areas reported 27 mm of rain, the Outlook area 10 mm, the Smiley area 36 mm, the Conquest area 7 mm, the Marengo area 40 mm, the Biggar area 27 mm, the Landis area 35 mm and the Major area 9 mm. The Saskatoon area has received the most precipitation (265 mm) in the region since April 1.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved slightly from last week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 80% adequate, 15% short and 5% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 71% adequate, 20% short and 9% very short.

The majority of crop damage this week was due to strong winds and high temperatures. A few storms rolled through the area causing hail damage. There is little insect or disease pressure and most producers have finished fungicide applications.

Producers are busy haying, scouting fields and hoping for more rain.

NORTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 8 -- HUDSON BAY, TISDALE, MELFORT, CARROT RIVER, HUMBOLDT, KINISTINO, CUDWORTH AND ABERDEEN AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9AE -- PRINCE ALBERT, CHOICELAND AND PADDOCKWOOD AREAS)

Crops are advancing nicely in the region despite high temperatures causing some stress. Overall, crops remain in good condition, although there are some areas that will need moisture in the coming weeks to fill heads and pods. Haying continues in the region with 25% of the hay crop cut and 37% baled or put into silage. Hay quality at this time is rated as 15% excellent, 69% good and 16% fair.

Scattered storms brought varying amounts of rain to the region along with strong winds. Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 26 mm in the Vonda area. The Star City area reported 2 mm of rain, the Arborfield area 5 mm, the Nipawin area 22 mm, the Humboldt area 3 mm, the Melfort area 15 mm, the Birch Hills area 23 mm and the Kinistino area 10 mm. The Arborfield area has received the most precipitation (260 mm) in the region since April 1.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved over the past week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 5% surplus, 81% adequate and 14% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 2% surplus, 84% adequate and 14% short.

The majority of crop damage this past week was due to drying winds and high temperatures. Many of the canola crops have been damaged from heat blasting with the recent high temperatures. Along with this there were some localized storms causing flooding and hail damage.

Farmers are busy haying and scouting for insects and disease.

NORTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 9AW -- SHELLBROOK, NORTH BATTLEFORD, BIG RIVER AND HAFFORD AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9B -- MEADOW LAKE, TURTLEFORD, PIERCELAND, MAIDSTONE AND LLOYDMINSTER AREAS)

Crops are looking good after some nice rains this past week. Producers are continuing with haying across the region this week. Twenty-three percent of the hay crop cut and 21% is baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 72% good and 28% fair.

Scattered rainshowers moved through the region last week, bringing strong winds and some hail. Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 103 mm in the Glaslyn area. The Hafford area received 58 mm of rain, the Duck Lake area 26 mm, the Mayfair area 56 mm, the Neilburg area 69 mm, the Spiritwood area 52 mm, the Turtleford area 61 mm and the Frenchman Butte area 87 mm. The St. Walburg area has received the most precipitation (305 mm) in the region since April 1.

Topsoil moisture conditions have slightly improved with the recent rainfall. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 7% surplus, 84% adequate and 9% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 6% surplus, 78% adequate and 16% short.

The majority of crop damage this past week is attributed to hail, flooding and strong winds. Producers have been finishing fungicide applications and keeping an eye on insect pest levels.

Producers are busy haying and scouting fields for any damage.

**

Ontario Winter Wheat Harvest Progress 7-10 Days Ahead of Last Year

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the Ontario Field Crop Report from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, released July 17.

CEREALS

Winter wheat harvest progress is around seven to 10 days ahead of last year. Given the relatively dry summer, early reports of yield have been average to below average although crop quality has been respectable.

CORN

Western bean cutworm moth trap counts have been very low so far compared to previous years. An interactive map of trapping numbers can be found at www.cornpest.ca. Many corn fields have begun tasseling and may avoid much of the risk though it is still important to scout for egg masses now.

SOYBEANS

Although some areas in the province have had seen soybean aphids populations at the action threshold and have sprayed, much of the province has aphid populations below the action threshold. Regular scouting should be done from now until the R6 (full seed) stage of soybean to minimize any yield loss with this pest. The aphid advisor app, which can be downloaded at www.aphidapp.com is a new tool that helps assess whether or not control of soybean aphids is warranted and also indicates other fields' results by county across the province. The action threshold is 250 aphids per plant on 80% of the plants and is actively increasing when the crop is in the R1 stage until end of R5 stage.

DRY CONDITIONS

Rain was highly variable across the province this week, giving some fields relief while others continue to deal with moisture stress. Information on the implications and help with making cropping decisions in dry conditions can be found at OMAFRA adverse weather webpage provided in the link below.

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/…

(AG)

 
Copyright DTN. All rights reserved. Disclaimer.
Powered By DTN